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Titre de l’article A self-perpetuating downward spiral? Investigating the temporal associations between sleep and stress in adolescence.
Code d’article P15
Auteurs
  1. Chiara Fontanellaz-Castiglione University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern / Translational Research Center, University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern
  2. Sarah Schmidt University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern
  3. Salome Wild UPD Bern, Universitätsklinik für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie und Psychotherapie Conférencier
  4. Michael Kaess Universitäre Psychiatrische Dienste Bern
  5. Leila Tarokh University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern / Translational Research Center, University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern
Forme de présentation Poster
Domaines thématiques
  • T04 - Adolescents
Résumé (Abstract) Introduction:

As evidence from animal models suggests, stress negatively affects sleep and is associated with both diminished sleep quality and reduced sleep duration. Conversely, alterations in sleep behavior can result in more stress. However, in humans, the temporal relationship between sleep and stress is still poorly understood. Therefore, the current longitudinal study aimed to investigate the associations between sleep and stress in both healthy and depressed adolescents.

Methods:

Thirty-two adolescents, thirteen of which were diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and nineteen healthy controls aged 14 to 17 years (mean = 15.13 (±1.13); 19 girls) participated in the study. Stress and sleep quality were assessed monthly using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), respectively. The sum score of the PSS and subjective sleep quality and duration derived from the PSQI served as outcome variables. On average, 10.41 months of data on sleep and stress were available across participants (range = 2 to 15 months). Cross-lagged panel analysis was performed to study the association between stress and sleep over time.

Results:

Stress and sleep duration were bi-directionally associated: Higher stress levels in the past month predicted shorter sleep duration in the following month (β -0.04, p < .001), and conversely, reduced subjective sleep duration predicted future higher stress (β = - 0.06, p < .01). In contrast, the association between stress and subjective sleep quality was uni-directional: Higher stress scores predicted lower subsequent subjective sleep quality (β = 0.03, p < .001), whereas lower reported sleep quality did not predict perceived future stress.

Conclusions:

Transcending psychiatric diagnosis, stress and sleep duration seem to be reciprocally associated over time. This bidirectional association is consistent with prior findings in animal models. As compared to a cross-sectional study design, our longitudinal approach helps to elucidate associations between sleep and stress that last over time. Given the reciprocity and persistence of the sleep-stress relationship as well as the importance of sleep for mental health and development, both these variables should be considered in prevention and mental health intervention in adolescence.